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The mere mention of New York in the twenties automatically conjures up a host of wild and vivid images: flapper-provocateurs, freshly minted millionaires, and witty raconteurs hopping from seedy speakeasy to lavish party to steamy jazz club, night after night, and well into most mornings.


  1. All-night Party: The Women of Bohemian Greenwich Village and Harlem, 1913-1930?
  2. Andrea Barnet — The Joy Harris Literary Agency, Inc..
  3. Customer Reviews.

But bohemian life in New York between the World Wars was far more subversive and had a much greater social impact than the popular notions of decadent play that loom so large now in our collective imagination. Scott Fitzgerald. Barnet clearly delights in recounting their outrageous antics, and liberally applies colorful detail throughout.

It was here that the denizens of Bohemian Greenwich Village and the creative forces fueling the Harlem Renaissance first commingled—along with European royalty, local mobsters, movie stars, and assorted freeloaders and hangers-on. That may be too tall an order for a survey across so many disciplines, but Barnet does fully capture the gleefully subversive ethos of life as performance art, and the air of lawless idealism that briefly raised dissent and transgression to an art form.

Disclosure: This article is not an endorsement, but a review. The author of this book provided free copies of the book to have their book reviewed by a professional reviewer. No fee was paid by the author for this review. Feb 26, Jill Hutchinson rated it liked it Shelves: american-history , film-music-history. At the dawn of the 20th century a group of people arose to challenge the public thinking on poetry, art, literature and music This book concentrates on six women who were a leading force in the movement in both Greenwich Village and Harlem from Some went on to fame and long careers while others are almost unknown today The lived their lives on their own terms and public opinion be damned.

Th At the dawn of the 20th century a group of people arose to challenge the public thinking on poetry, art, literature and music They were smart, colorful, talented, and eccentric Nevertheless, they soldiered on when money was lacking and no one appreciated their contributions to the arts. They broke the color barrier and supported each others efforts even when jealousies and tempers flared.

In most cases they were flawed individuals but they had something to say and were not hesitant to put forth their abstract for the times ideas.

Andrea Barnet

An interesting look at an interesting time. Jul 19, Jean Perry rated it really liked it. Very interesting book about creative women of the 's.

The sub-title is "the Women of. Bohemian Geenwich Village and Harlem. It led me to look for other books about the women described. I was a little put-off by the fact that the Black women were ALL talked about at the end of the book. I'm a 70 year old White woman and have nothing to do with the publishing business and even i know that that is not good editing of material and might be offensive to some readers.

I couldn't see any Very interesting book about creative women of the 's.


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  • I couldn't see any reasoning for placement - they weren't alphabetical, they weren't chronological. The closest idea i could see for placement was that the African-American women were all entertainers or actresses as opposed to writers or artists at the beginning of the book. But really, a little consciousness please. BTW this book was published in Dec 04, Kim Springer rated it it was amazing. Written by my sister so yes, 5 stars. Well written and easy to read. Mar 02, Madeline rated it it was ok Shelves: , bright-young-things , history , library-books , non-fiction , women , wwi , biography , queer , marriage-lets-you-down.

    There is not very much analysis in All-Night Party , which is really a shame, especially given the women she chose to focus on: the hostesses are fairly obscure, and Mina Loy is probably not as popular as she was, but Edna St. My favorite chapter was the one which discussed Jane Heap and Margaret Anderson, who are much more obscure and therefore more interesting. I am a big fan of Millay, but one chapter in a group biograp There is not very much analysis in All-Night Party , which is really a shame, especially given the women she chose to focus on: the hostesses are fairly obscure, and Mina Loy is probably not as popular as she was, but Edna St.

    I am a big fan of Millay, but one chapter in a group biography is bound to suffer in comparison with Nancy Milford's excellent Savage Beauty.

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    But I suppose one of the virtues of this book is that it shows a little bit of flair with its selection. Not too much flair, of course. Enough that the pedestrian parts are disappointing. Ultimately, Barnet fails in her premise and disappoints the promise of the title. She never shows the true intersection of Greenwich Village and Harlem except for some comments about Carl Van Vechten. What analysis she does offer is facile, and on issues of race and sexuality she seems uncomfortable or unqualified.

    Although the time period post-WWI is a fascinating one it gave us Fitzgerald, the Mitfords, the women in this book, Evelyn Waugh and on and on! The book needed a unifying theme, at the very least. It also needed more depth. Or, if it didn't have some more depth, then it might have gone for flash. But the production values aren't very high on this one either. So it isn't even a tony coffee table book.


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    • Probably would be great for first-year high school students, though! I think high school students would find this genuinely useful, especially if they're looking for something a little bit unexpected for their Harlem Renaissance project, or whatever.

      1960s Greenwich Village at Night, New York, Nightlife

      Jul 24, Roxanne. Interesting glimpse into the lives of several women who were contemporaries during the Progressive Era. It makes me think of social progress from a different perspective; it seems not to be a steady push forward, but we advance in great waves and heaves. Oct 20, Pia rated it really liked it. The biographies are somewhat incomplete. You can definitely find better information elsewhere on some of the women included in this book. However, as a whole it's worth reading as a portrait of the era. It's a great starting point if you're interested in any of the subjects.

      May 06, Diane Nagatomo rated it it was amazing. I skimmed this book in one sitting on the train to prepare for a "React to the Past" workshop that will cover this era. I'll definitely go back and reread it again I had no idea.

      "Visionary Women" By Andrea Barnet | WAMC

      Feb 25, Donna Lewis rated it liked it. I skimmed most of the book but did read the sections about Bessie Smith and Ethel Waters, both of whom had much more difficult lives than the white bohemians in Greenwich Village. Mar 16, Robin rated it liked it Shelves: history-us , women , biography. They are mostly white writers, black singers, or patrons of the arts. One strength of this book is that it presents many of these women in relation to one another, so that the reader gets an idea of the overall Greenwich Village society.

      It does less well depicting Harlem, where just two singers and one arts patron are considered. One theme is the intermixing of whites and blacks, of uptown and downtown, at social events hosted by patrons. But as another reviewer noted, the chapters on the black women are at the very end of the book and not as elaborated as earlier chapters, which tended to trivialize their stories. I learned way too much about Edna St. Vincent Millay for example, and not enough about Bessie Smith. Vincent Millay. This is most useful when the characters appear in several chapters.

      Overall, All Night Party is an interesting read for those who want to learn about the Greenwich Village scene during the era just prior to WWI through the beginning of the Great Depression. Oct 02, Kara rated it liked it Recommends it for: women's history fans. Shelves: nonfiction-bios-memoirs , lady-business. The women Barnet includes in this look at the early 20th-century Boho set are fascinating: Edna St.

      Millay, Mina Loy, Bessie Smith, among others. They led wild, excessive lives in the pursuit of art and the New Woman. They took part in salons, started their own literary journals, declared themselves futurists and modernists, fostered addictions, slept with whomever they liked, and generally scandalized the rest of post-Victorian America.

      While there stories are all very interesting, much of the b The women Barnet includes in this look at the early 20th-century Boho set are fascinating: Edna St. While there stories are all very interesting, much of the book just amounts to portraits of each woman rather than a cohesive portrait of an era. It would've helped for Barnet to give more of a social backdrop, to further define their struggles and triumphs. Despite that nitpickiness, All-Night Party definitely has me interested in looking further into these women and their work.

      Aug 16, Cherie rated it liked it. Interesting, but skimmed. Jan 20, Erin rated it it was ok. Skip the St. Vincent Millay chapter, though, and just read her bio.. Jan 06, Shelley Marlow added it. This book is helping me research for my silent film actress character in Two Augusts in a Row in a Row.

      Jan 31, Irene Palfy rated it it was amazing Shelves: re-read , auto-biographies , favourites. Thank you! Oct 26, K. Vincent Millay, Mabel Dodge. She brings to life their connections with Greenwich Village and Harlem, along with the times they existed. She shows the impact these individuals had on them, exploding like fireworks which shook rigid systems of gender, and created bright possibilities of individuality.

      Some of their names stirred a dim recognization, but little character. This brief, but brilliant taste of whom they were and what they accomplished left me hungry for more. The taste included a glimpse of other fascinating individuals such as Madam C. Walker whom every American child should be learning about in their grade school texts and Carl Van Vechten. Many of these people played not only played vital and vibrant parts in history, but in long neglected herstory and queerstory.